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Start the Conversation! An introduction to the Canadian Index of Wellbeing
 
04:15
Canada is at the threshold of a defining moment, a defining moment of change, a moment of innovation, and of clarity. This is the Canadian Index of Wellbeing, a new way of focusing on how we're doing in Canada: not just how much our economy is growing, but how well we live. But let's start at the beginning. There are times in history when destabilizing world events turn into defining moments for change and innovation. In the twentieth century, two global events destabilized entire nations: the Great Depression and World War II. Then, gross domestic product, or GDP, became the standard way to assess economic prosperity. GDP is a composite index based on a complicated formula that tells us whether an economy is growing or shrinking. Worldwide, GDP has become the most popular way to measure the economic status of a nation; but GDP has its limits. It reveals the dollars and cents of a nation but it can't tell us if economic growth is translating into a better quality of life. Now we have a true partner to the GDP: the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW). It isn't just a number; it reflects real life. It tells us how we're really doing, where we're making progress, and where we're falling behind. Some of Canada's leading thinkers answered the call to create a new way of measuring our quality of life, in all its dimensions. After extensive public consultation, the CIW chose 64 indicators rooted in Canadian values. These indicators make up the core of the CIW's 8 main categories, what we call domains. Starting with our base year of 1994, the CIW offers a composite index that's more comprehensive and realistic than GDP alone. It's something that can guide us on questions that run deeper than economic growth. The CIW tells us whether our health is getting better, or worse; whether housing is becoming more affordable or out of reach; whether we have enough time for leisure, culture, and quality family time. It helps spot troubling trends that policy makers can address. Things like the growing gap between rich and poor, a drop in the number of years lived in good health, or soaring greenhouse gases that jeopardize our health and economy. It also tells us where we're improving; for example, fewer teenagers smoking and more connected communities. Add up all of the 64 indicators in 8 domains and what you get is a reflection of how Canadians are really doing in life. Until now we've never had a way of measuring whether economic growth equals a better quality of life. Clearly, a healthy economy is important but can we really call it progress if it comes at the expense of our personal time, a more stressful life, and a planet left in peril for our children and grandchildren? The CIW shows us that as a nation we have choices. We can have a thriving economy, and raise the quality of life for all Canadians. By twinning GDP with the CIW, Canadians can see how close we're coming to creating the kind of country we want for ourselves and future generations. And governments of all levels can use the information to guide them towards smarter, more time sensitive decision making. It's why the CIW is more than just a number; it's a reflection of how we live, regardless of whether GDP is growing or shrinking. It's a made-in-Canada innovation and we're proud to launch it into the world during such a defining moment. What choices would you make? We challenge each of you to start the conversation!
Views: 12171 CIW Network
Au-delà du PIB
 
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Globe Village, Mostra production www.mostra.com. Globe Village, Mostra production www.mostra.com. Gross Domestic Product is a good way of measuring production but there's an increasing consensus that new tools are needed for calculating progress, wellbeing, and our ecological footprint on the planet.
Views: 1026 CIW Network
Keynote Speech by The Honourable Roy J. Romanow (Part 1 of 3)
 
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Keynote Speech by The Honourable Roy J. Romanow, Chair, CIW Advisory Board Canadian Index of Wellbeing University of Waterloo
Views: 362 CIW Network
Canada Environmental Path lecture by Alexis Morgan (Part 1 of 3)
 
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Canada Environmental Path: Jeopardizing Our Country's Long-term Quality of Life Alexis Morgan, Associate, The Pembina Institute Canadian Index of Wellbeing University of Waterloo
Views: 163 CIW Network
How the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW) is Leading Change in Canada
 
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FULL TRANSCRIPTION AT http://canadianindexofwellbeing.wordpress.com/2012/05/11/oecd-powerpoint-video-transcription-notes/ [1] Bryan Smale, Director of the Canadian Index of Wellbeing at the University of Waterloo. This presentation is about the Index and about how we are making efforts to bring about change in Canada. For more information visit http://www.ciw.ca, find us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/CIWnetwork, or on Twitter @CIWnetwork. [2] More than a decade ago fifty of Canada's leading public policy experts and advocates came together to discuss how to promote long-term economic and social justice. One participant posed the question: What if every time Canadians head about GDP, TSX, or DOW, they also got quantitative data about a wide variety of other social, health, economic, and environmental factors? The idea was based on the very astute observation that indicators are powerful. What we count matters. What we count helps shape the dialogue in this country--on the factory floor, around the water cooler, in the media, in the halls of academe and in the corridors of power. What we count often influences the policy agendas and decisions of governments. [3] The CIW has been struck to fully develop its signature product, the Canadian Index of Wellbeing. You can see its vision here. It will also commission research and issue reports on Canadian wellbeing, and identify gaps in knowledge relevant to measuring wellbeing. The Institute will promote a new understanding of wellbeing and a dialogue that reshapes the way we talk about wellbeing and public policy issues. [4] To realize this vision, the CIW's mission is to conduct and share research on QOL, particularly research based on trends in wellbeing relative to measures such as GDP; to encourage decision makers to consider such evidence when developing policy; to encourage Canadians to take part in the conversation and advocate for change that conforms to their values.
Views: 1206 CIW Network
Keynote Speech by The Honourable Roy J. Romanow (Part 2 of 3)
 
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Keynote Speech by The Honourable Roy J. Romanow, Chair, CIW Advisory Board Canadian Index of Wellbeing University of Waterloo
Views: 86 CIW Network
Canada Environmental Path lecture by Alexis Morgan (Part 3 of 3)
 
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Canada Environmental Path: Jeopardizing Our Country's Long-term Quality of Life Alexis Morgan, Associate, The Pembina Institute Canadian Index of Wellbeing University of Waterloo
Views: 79 CIW Network
Keynote Speech by The Honourable Roy J. Romanow (Part 3 of 3)
 
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Keynote Speech by The Honourable Roy J. Romanow, Chair, CIW Advisory Board Canadian Index of Wellbeing University of Waterloo
Views: 78 CIW Network
Canada Environmental Path lecture by Alexis Morgan (Part 2 of 3)
 
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Canada Environmental Path: Jeopardizing Our Country's Long-term Quality of Life Alexis Morgan, Associate, The Pembina Institute Canadian Index of Wellbeing University of Waterloo
Views: 113 CIW Network
Charting the impact of the Canadian Index of Wellbeing in the work of Community Health Centres
 
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2017 marks 10 years since Roy Romanow, former Saskatchewan premier and author of the landmark report on the future of health care in Canada, first spoke at the annual AOHC Conference and introduced members to the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW). The talk inspired AOHC members to use the CIW as a powerful tool to enable their efforts to make health and wellbeing part of the conversation and decision-making processes. Today, more than 40 AOHC members are using the CIW to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals, families and entire communities. AOHC produced this video to celebrate this work and to highlight member successes and milestones. To further explore examples of the CIW in action, read stories of positive change, and access resources to help you apply the CIW in your organization, visit communityhealthandwellbeing.org For more information about the CIW visit ciw.ca
Views: 31 CIW Network
Beyond GDP
 
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Globe Village, Mostra production www.mostra.com. Gross Domestic Product is a good way of measuring production but there's an increasing consensus that new tools are needed for calculating progress, wellbeing, and our ecological footprint on the planet.
Views: 694 CIW Network
Entamer la conversation ! Une introduction à l'Indice canadien du mieux-être
 
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Le Canada est à l'orée d'un moment déterminant. Un moment de changement déterminant. Un moment d'innovation déterminant. Et de clarté. Voici l'Indice canadien du mieux-être, une façon nouvelle d'examiner la façon dont se porte le Canada, non seulement sur le plan de sa croissance économique, mais aussi de sa qualité de vie. Mais commençons par le début... Il y a des périodes dans l'histoire où des évènements mondiaux déstabilisants se transforment en moments de changement et d'innovation déterminants. Au XXe siècle, deux évènements planétaires ont déstabilisé des pays tout entiers : la Crise et la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Dans leur foulée, le produit intérieur brut, c'est-à-dire le PIB, est devenu la façon uniforme d'évaluer la prospérité économique. Le PIB est un indice composé basé sur une formule complexe qui nous dit si l'économie croît ou se contracte. À l'échelle du monde, le PIB est devenu le moyen le plus populaire de mesurer la santé économique d'un pays. Mais le PIB a ses limites. Il révèle la valeur en dollars et en cents d'un pays, mais il ne peut pas nous dire si la croissance économique se traduit par une qualité de vie améliorée. Or maintenant, le PIB a un véritable partenaire : L'Indice canadien du mieux-être, ou l'ICME. L'ICME n'est pas un simple chiffre. Il correspond à la vraie vie. Il nous dit comment nous nous portons VÉRITABLEMENT, là où nous faisons des progrès et là où nous reculons. Quelques-uns des plus grands penseurs du Canada ont répondu à l'appel afin de créer une façon nouvelle de mesurer notre qualité de vie, dans toutes ses dimensions. À la suite d'importantes consultations publiques, l'ICME a retenu 64 indicateurs, bien ancrés dans des valeurs canadiennes. Ces indicateurs constituent les fondements des huit principales catégories ou domaines de l'ICME. À compter de son année de référence : 1994, l'ICMÊ propose un indice composé plus complet et réaliste que le PIB à lui seul. Il s'agit d'un outil qui peut nous informer sur des questions plus profondes que la simple croissance économique. L'ICME nous dit :  si notre santé s'améliore ou se détériore  si le logement devient plus abordable ou inabordable  si nous disposons d'assez de temps pour des activités récréatives et culturelles et passer de bons moments en famille. Il aide à déceler des tendances troublantes auxquelles les décideurs peuvent s'attaquer. Des choses comme :  l'écart croissant entre les riches et les pauvres  la baisse du nombre d'années vécues en bonne santé  la montée en flèche des gaz à effet de serre, une menace pour notre santé et notre économie. Il témoigne aussi de nos progrès :  Moins d'ados fument  La solidarité au sein des collectivités est plus grande Si vous additionnez les 64 indicateurs dans les huit domaines, vous voyez comment se portent véritablement les Canadiens et Canadiennes. Jusqu'à ce jour, nous n'avions pas de façon de déterminer si la croissance économique correspondait à une meilleure qualité de vie. Certes, une économie en santé est importante, mais peut-on vraiment parler de progrès si cette croissance se fait au détriment du temps pour soi et au prix d'une vie plus stressée et d'une planète en péril laissée en héritage à nos enfants et petits enfants? L'ICME nous indique qu'en tant que nation, nous avons des choix. Il est possible d'avoir une économie prospère ET d'améliorer la qualité de vie de TOUS les Canadiens et Canadiennes. En jumelant le PIB à l'ICME, il sera possible de voir dans quelle mesure on est près du pays souhaité pour soi et pour les prochaines générations. Et tous les ordres de gouvernement peuvent utiliser cette information pour prendre des décisions plus éclairées et plus opportunes. C'est pour cette raison que l'ICME n'est pas simplement un chiffre... Il reflète notre façon de vivre, peu importe que le PIB augmente ou diminue. l'ICME est une innovation fabriquée au Canada et nous sommes fiers de le publier à un moment aussi déterminant. Quels choix feriez-vous? Nous vous mettons tous et toutes au défi d'entamer la conversation.
Views: 801 CIW Network
A tool for planning, policymaking, and nation building
 
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Roy J. Romanow speaks to the 4th OECD World Forum on Statistics, Knowledge, and Policy called "Measuring Well-Being for Development and Policy Making," at New Delhi, India, October 17, 2012. Find notes here: https://uwaterloo.ca/canadian-index-wellbeing/resources/speaking-notes
Views: 381 CIW Network